Land Rover Discovery D300 Metropolitan Edition 2022 review

Published by
Peter Kavinsky

The introduction of the Metropolitan Edition probably won’t help that either, as it’s at the top of the range with a price tag of £74,070 (for the P360, a 355bhp straight-six petrol) or £75,475 (for the D300, a 296 hp straight). -six diesel, tested here).

That doesn’t mean it isn’t a very attractive spec for Disco types, mind you. No baggy pants here, but there’s a medallion tucked away in the B-pillar, along with uniquely Bright Atlas grille detailing, Hakuba Silver lower bumper inserts, 22-inch alloy wheels with brilliant gray diamond cut, and calipers. black brakes; and inside, a sliding glass roof, a head-up display, a heated steering wheel, wireless phone charging, a refrigerated compartment, four-zone climate control and an eye-catching Titanium Mesh finish. This last item complements the standard Windsor Leather upholstery in the case of our car colored in a combination of Light Oyster and Ebony, which divides the vast expanses well compared to the Ebony and Caraway options.

Vast expanses are indeed, because this is a truly huge car with a proportionately huge interior. You sit far away from the front passenger in your very comfortable, infinitely adjustable seat, while two other adults can happily sit behind you and two kids behind them again.

Also worth noting on the inside is the Pivi Pro infotainment system, with its large curved touchscreen. It looks very slick indeed, not falling into the trap of being overbearing or jarring, instead blending in with the rest of the interior architecture. And to wear, it’s pretty straightforward once you get used to it, and not once in our week-long test did it get a kink in the panties.

After a significant round of chassis upgrades in 2021, the Discovery continues to be very impressive on the road for something that goes much, much further down the road than the comparable Audi Q7 or BMW X5.

They might look sportier to drive, but the big Landie still drives pretty well on country tracks (which it really needs, considering its unnerving girth), while its on-road demeanor is that of a proper cruiser, handling long-wave compressions. in a relaxed manner and generally disguising minor imperfections.

The D300 is probably the most sensible choice, surprisingly refined for a diesel and offering big waves of torque at very low revs for effortless overtaking – something that will also make life easier if you need to crawl over rocks. The only disappointment is its economy: 30mpg in our test. Yes, that’s a big, bulky thing, but it’s also a mild hybrid diesel.

The introduction of the Metropolitan Edition probably won’t help that either, as it’s at the top of the range with a price tag of £74,070 (for the P360, a 355bhp straight-six petrol) or £75,475 (for the D300, a 296 hp straight). -six diesel, tested here).

That doesn’t mean it isn’t a very attractive spec for Disco types, mind you. No baggy pants here, but there’s a medallion tucked away in the B-pillar, along with uniquely Bright Atlas grille detailing, Hakuba Silver lower bumper inserts, 22-inch alloy wheels with brilliant gray diamond cut, and calipers. black brakes; and inside, a sliding glass roof, a head-up display, a heated steering wheel, wireless phone charging, a refrigerated compartment, four-zone climate control and an eye-catching Titanium Mesh finish. This last item complements the standard Windsor Leather upholstery in the case of our car colored in a combination of Light Oyster and Ebony, which divides the vast expanses well compared to the Ebony and Caraway options.

Vast expanses are indeed, because this is a truly huge car with a proportionately huge interior. You sit far away from the front passenger in your very comfortable, infinitely adjustable seat, while two other adults can happily sit behind you and two kids behind them again.

Also worth noting on the inside is the Pivi Pro infotainment system, with its large curved touchscreen. It looks very slick indeed, not falling into the trap of being overbearing or jarring, instead blending in with the rest of the interior architecture. And to wear, it’s pretty straightforward once you get used to it, and not once in our week-long test did it get a kink in the panties.

After a significant round of chassis upgrades in 2021, the Discovery continues to be very impressive on the road for something that goes much, much further down the road than the comparable Audi Q7 or BMW X5.

They might look sportier to drive, but the big Landie still drives pretty well on country tracks (which it really needs, considering its unnerving girth), while its on-road demeanor is that of a proper cruiser, handling long-wave compressions. in a relaxed manner and generally disguising minor imperfections.

The D300 is probably the most sensible choice, surprisingly refined for a diesel and offering big waves of torque at very low revs for effortless overtaking – something that will also make life easier if you need to crawl over rocks. The only disappointment is its economy: 30mpg in our test. Yes, that’s a big, bulky thing, but it’s also a mild hybrid diesel.

The introduction of the Metropolitan Edition probably won’t help that either, as it’s at the top of the range with a price tag of £74,070 (for the P360, a 355bhp straight-six petrol) or £75,475 (for the D300, a 296 hp straight). -six diesel, tested here).

That doesn’t mean it isn’t a very attractive spec for Disco types, mind you. No baggy pants here, but there’s a medallion tucked away in the B-pillar, along with uniquely Bright Atlas grille detailing, Hakuba Silver lower bumper inserts, 22-inch alloy wheels with brilliant gray diamond cut, and calipers. black brakes; and inside, a sliding glass roof, a head-up display, a heated steering wheel, wireless phone charging, a refrigerated compartment, four-zone climate control and an eye-catching Titanium Mesh finish. This last item complements the standard Windsor Leather upholstery in the case of our car colored in a combination of Light Oyster and Ebony, which divides the vast expanses well compared to the Ebony and Caraway options.

Vast expanses are indeed, because this is a truly huge car with a proportionately huge interior. You sit far away from the front passenger in your very comfortable, infinitely adjustable seat, while two other adults can happily sit behind you and two kids behind them again.

Also worth noting on the inside is the Pivi Pro infotainment system, with its large curved touchscreen. It looks very slick indeed, not falling into the trap of being overbearing or jarring, instead blending in with the rest of the interior architecture. And to wear, it’s pretty straightforward once you get used to it, and not once in our week-long test did it get a kink in the panties.

After a significant round of chassis upgrades in 2021, the Discovery continues to be very impressive on the road for something that goes much, much further down the road than the comparable Audi Q7 or BMW X5.

They might look sportier to drive, but the big Landie still drives pretty well on country tracks (which it really needs, considering its unnerving girth), while its on-road demeanor is that of a proper cruiser, handling long-wave compressions. in a relaxed manner and generally disguising minor imperfections.

The D300 is probably the most sensible choice, surprisingly refined for a diesel and offering big waves of torque at very low revs for effortless overtaking – something that will also make life easier if you need to crawl over rocks. The only disappointment is its economy: 30mpg in our test. Yes, that’s a big, bulky thing, but it’s also a mild hybrid diesel.

The introduction of the Metropolitan Edition probably won’t help that either, as it’s at the top of the range with a price tag of £74,070 (for the P360, a 355bhp straight-six petrol) or £75,475 (for the D300, a 296 hp straight). -six diesel, tested here).

That doesn’t mean it isn’t a very attractive spec for Disco types, mind you. No baggy pants here, but there’s a medallion tucked away in the B-pillar, along with uniquely Bright Atlas grille detailing, Hakuba Silver lower bumper inserts, 22-inch alloy wheels with brilliant gray diamond cut, and calipers. black brakes; and inside, a sliding glass roof, a head-up display, a heated steering wheel, wireless phone charging, a refrigerated compartment, four-zone climate control and an eye-catching Titanium Mesh finish. This last item complements the standard Windsor Leather upholstery in the case of our car colored in a combination of Light Oyster and Ebony, which divides the vast expanses well compared to the Ebony and Caraway options.

Vast expanses are indeed, because this is a truly huge car with a proportionately huge interior. You sit far away from the front passenger in your very comfortable, infinitely adjustable seat, while two other adults can happily sit behind you and two kids behind them again.

Also worth noting on the inside is the Pivi Pro infotainment system, with its large curved touchscreen. It looks very slick indeed, not falling into the trap of being overbearing or jarring, instead blending in with the rest of the interior architecture. And to wear, it’s pretty straightforward once you get used to it, and not once in our week-long test did it get a kink in the panties.

After a significant round of chassis upgrades in 2021, the Discovery continues to be very impressive on the road for something that goes much, much further down the road than the comparable Audi Q7 or BMW X5.

They might look sportier to drive, but the big Landie still drives pretty well on country tracks (which it really needs, considering its unnerving girth), while its on-road demeanor is that of a proper cruiser, handling long-wave compressions. in a relaxed manner and generally disguising minor imperfections.

The D300 is probably the most sensible choice, surprisingly refined for a diesel and offering big waves of torque at very low revs for effortless overtaking – something that will also make life easier if you need to crawl over rocks. The only disappointment is its economy: 30mpg in our test. Yes, that’s a big, bulky thing, but it’s also a mild hybrid diesel.

Peter Kavinsky

Peter Kavinsky is the Executive Editor at cablefreetv.org

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