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Panasonic confirms data breach after hackers access internal network

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Panasonic confirms data breach after hackers access internal network

Japanese tech giant Panasonic has confirmed a data breach after hackers gained access to its internal network.

Panasonic said in a press release dated November 26 that its network was “illegally accessed by a third party” on November 11 and that “some data on a file server had been accessed during the intrusion.”

The Osaka, Japan-based company didn’t provide any further details, but Japanese news outlet NHK reports that hackers managed to access sensitive data including information on the company’s partners, personal details related to customers and employees, and technical files from the company’s domestic operations. The report also claims that the as-yet-unknown threat actors had access to the company’s server for more than four months, from June 22 to November 3, before Panasonic detected abnormal network activity earlier this month.

Panasonic spokesperson Jim Wickizer did not respond to a request for comment.

In its press release, the company said that in addition to conducting its own investigation, it’s “currently working with a specialist third-party organization to investigate the leak and determine if the breach involved customers’ personal information and/or sensitive information related to social infrastructure.”

“After detecting the unauthorized access, the company immediately reported the incident to the relevant authorities and implemented security countermeasures, including steps to prevent external access to the network,” it added. “Panasonic would like to express its sincerest apologies for any concern or inconvenience resulting from this incident.”

News of this data breach comes less than a year after Panasonic India was hit with a ransomware attack that saw hackers leak 4 gigabytes of data, including financial information and email addresses. It also comes amid a wave of cyberattacks targeting Japanese technology companies. NEC and Mitsubishi Electric both fell victim to hackers last year, and Olympus was recently forced to suspend its European, Middle East and Africa operations after being hit by BlackMatter ransomware.

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